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ClickZ: Men and Women and the Inbox: Is There Real Impact?

ClickZ: Men and Women and the Inbox: Is There Real Impact?


Men and Women and the Inbox: Is There Real Impact?

Source: ClickZ

By: Stephanie Miller

We can’t turn ourselves off as we participate in business or leisure, and so we also bring our gender identity and attributes to every activity, including reading e-mail messages. Given the impact of gender, is it a good idea for you to customize e-mail messaging between men and women? The answer, of course, depends on your program, brand loyalty, and product or service. There’s probably a lot of insight we can each glean from our own program data.

Look at response rates, complaint and unsubscribe requests, and buying habits by gender, and see if there are differences by offer type, subject line, time of day, or frequency.

The effort could be well worth it. Out in the wild, there’s evidence that men and women interact with e-mail differently:

  • Research from a Pew Internet American Life study found that men use e-mail and the Internet mostly for information gathering, like weather, news, how-to advice, sports, and politics. Women are more likely to use e-mail for relationship building, like staying in touch with other family members or communicating with like-minded individuals, such as other mothers. They also use e-mail and the Internet for more personal issues, like health concerns or religion and spirituality.
  • A recent British research study found gender differences in responding to design. It’s a fascinating report (although dense), and it seems little girls are not, in fact, hard wired to prefer pink. Among adults, the study found that women liked website content with more color in the background and typeface. Men liked darker colors and horizontal lines.
  • The 2010 Messaging Anti Abuse Working Group (MAAWG) E-mail Security Awareness and Usage report looked at how men and women perceive e-mail and spam. They found that males, and particularly younger males, engaged in riskier behavior when it came to spam and phishing attacks. Men were more likely to open spam, click through on the links, and even reply to spam. Women were not as trusting, and looked more closely at the e-mail address or sender’s name, as opposed to the content, to determine whether or not to open an e-mail. Women were also more likely to set up a separate e-mail account for things like marketing messages and spam.
  • An analysis of opt-out and complaint data found similar behaviors. My colleague Tom Sather analyzed the differences between how men and women interact with the mail program of a major dating site. He found that women had a much higher opt-out and complaint rate. Frequency was a factor, as women would be more likely to mark messages as spam if there were an above average number of notifications. The opposite was true for men, who seemed to welcome the higher volumes.

Read the full post!

  • Profile:  Jeff Ginsberg has 17+ years’ experience and is an industry known authority on email marketing who gets in the trenches with clients and helps them fulfill their marketing objectives, increase revenue and brand engagement. Clients rely on him and his team at The eMail Company to provide them with expertise from strategy to technology and from campaign management to channel integration. Jeff has worked with clients across all spectrums in the financial, automotive, retail and consumer packaged goods space. His experience covers both B2B and B2C markets. He has a strong background in educating and training agencies and clients about email best practices and is a wealth of knowledge when it comes to marketing tools and vendor selection. While Jeff’s team may be small, they know how to solve BIG email marketing problems. Looking for help with your next campaign? Don’t be afraid to give him a call – Jeff and his team ready to help you today. Give me a call: Toll Free: 877-We-eMail (877-933-6245) Local: 416-225-7711 eMail: jeff@theemailcompany.com
  • Website:  http://www.theemailguide.com
  • Twitter:   http://www.twitter.com/theemailguide
  • LinkedIn:   http://ca.linkedin.com/in/chiefemailofficer
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