Two Principles of Psychology to Incorporate into Your Email Marketing by Laura Ashley @tailoredmail

Two Principles of Psychology to Incorporate into Your Email Marketing by Laura Ashley @tailoredmail


Two Principles of Psychology to Incorporate into Your Email Marketing

 

Principle #1: Social Proof

Social proof (aka informational social influence) is the phenomenon that people look to the behavior of others when determining how to behave or when deciding upon a course of action. It is a way for a person to quickly validate their planned course of action for the best possible outcome. This can be applied to email marketing in the following ways:

  • Incorporating positive ratings of the product or service you are promoting. If someone has any need or desire at all for what is being featured in your email, reading about another positive experience will give them a push towards that offer.
  • Highlighting the number of other people who have done what you are asking them to do, whether it’s buying your product, using your service, reading your white paper, “Liking” your offer or giving it a “+1”.
  • Including a customer quote about your product, service or brand. Even if the quote is anonymous, it should reference some details about the reviewer, such as location and some sort of description that relates to the target audience like “32 Year Old Mother of Two” for a kid’s clothing retailer or “Vice President of Information Services” for a B2B technology company.

These additions are reasonably done and can increase your response rates dramatically.  They can even be dynamically published to make them even more relevant to specific segments.

Principle #2: Conditioning

Conditioning has to do with driving predictable behavior. There are two distinct types of conditioning in psychology, classical (dealing with involuntary actions—“I can’t keep from doing this or that”) and operant (dealing with voluntary actions—“I will think about this before I act”).

By sending emails that aren’t relevant, you may be employing classical conditioning that makes your subscribers delete your emails without even reading them.  To avoid this, track the behavior of your subscribers in the first 90 days of being in your email database.  Pay attention to what they do and what they don’t open or click.  After the first three months, use that behavioral data to be more selective in what you send to them.

Here are some ways of using operant conditioning to increase engagement with your emails:

  • Include an element of content in your emails that causes your subscribers to anticipate receipt. For example, as a frequent flyer, I consistently open and review the emails from my preferred airline to see how close I am to the next status level. Also, people are happy to give their opinions, if it’s easy to do so.  Put a simple “Rate this email” with the option of up to five stars at the top of an email for regular feedback and engagement.
  • Always include a personalized recommendation. It can be extremely individualized using a recommendation engine or done by segment.  It can, but doesn’t have to, include images. Also, keeping it understated by placing the recommendation in the header or footer as text rather than in the body of the message can make it more effective.
  • Categorize your promotional emails and send them consistently at the same day and time. Whether you send weekly or monthly, be consistent and predictable. This builds trust with your subscriber, and it’s a subtly positive commentary on your brand as well.

Takeaway: Principles of psychology are quite intuitive and can give us an edge when employed methodically in our email communications. Pull out your Psychology 101 textbook and you’ll be surprised by how quickly and easily you can apply the information in the context of email marketing. Also make sure to be systematic in how you implement and test new tactics, rather than just going with your gut.

Meet the author:

Raingal7

Raingal7

Laura is a seasoned email and database marketing strategist who has done both business-to-business demand generation and business-to-consumer lifecycle marketing. She has worked with some of the savviest email marketing organizations in the retail, travel, gaming and technology industries. Laura is currently Director of Market Development at TailoredMail, a Seattle-based email service provider who specializes in making email campaigns and landing page content more personalized, social and mobile-friendly.

Connect with: Raingal7

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